GUIDED TOUR OF MALVERN WITH LUNCH : Saturday 12th May

 An invitation to visit historic Malvern hosted by the Malvern Society.
10.00 : Meet at the Great Malvern Hotel, followed by guided town visit (approx. one mile)
12.15 : Buffet lunch
14.00 : Guided visit to Malvern Priory
15.30 : End of the formal visit (An optional backstage visit to the Festival Theatre can also be arranged by Malvern Society)
  

Guided visit to Malvern – last call!

 Spaces are still available but bookings need to be received by Friday 4th May.

We are pleased to say that the cost of the visit, which includes lunch, has worked out £5 less than expected at £25 each.  Transport arrangements will be coordinated after Friday 4th.  Anyone choosing to go by train will be treated to the superb station canopy at Malvern station, as seen here.

To sign up, email David Bower at visit@knowlesociety.org.uk or call 01564 775790. See page 9 of the current, April, newsletter for more details.

APRIL PUBLIC MEETING ELEPHANTS FOR AFRICA – 16 APRIL KNOWLE VILLAGE HALL

All are welcome.

Chadwick End resident, Dr Kate Evans, became enthralled by elephants at the age of seven, in Sri Lanka. After studying zoology at Swansea University, and gaining experience on various projects in southern Africa, she moved to Botswana’s Okavango delta to study elephant behaviour for her PhD.

Kate founded Elephants for Africa in December 2007 and that, alongside her ongoing research work in collaboration with the University of Bristol and University of Exeter, has been the focus of her work ever since.

 The charity is dedicated to the conservation of elephants and the other wildlife that share their natural habitat, understanding and combating the threats to their survival and managing the conflicts between the interests of the elephants and those of local villagers.

 With eighteen years of experience of field work, studying these magnificent mammals, Kate is coming to the Knowle Society to share her passion for them, to explain how ecologically essential it is to sustain them, and the challenges that they face to the survival. No doubt she will also be able to tell a tale or two of the practicalities of living in a tent in elephant country!

 Come and find out more about Kate’s endeavours and the work of her charity at Knowle Village Hall at 8pm on Monday 16 April.

All are welcome.

Knowle Fun Run – Sunday 20 May : Places still available

Join 1800 other runners for this year’s 35th Knowle Fun Run. With a choice of individual and team competitions for both 5k or 10k, runners have no excuse not to get fit for Solihull’s longest running Fun Run with a great community atmosphere on traffic-free streets.

Help raise funds for Headway the brain injuries charity & the new Breast Cancer Haven in Solihull. Half of the proceeds are retained for Lions locally determined causes. [Or run for your own cause.] Enter the Kids for the Years 1-4 runs around the field.

Enter online at www.knowlefunrun.org.uk

KNOWLE FUN RUN 2018 Sunday 20 May

Entries are open for May’s 35th Knowle Fun Run. With a choice of individual and team competitions for both 5k or 10k, runners have no excuse not to get fit for Solihull’s longest running Fun Run with a great community atmosphere on traffic-free streets and help raise funds for Headway the brain injuries charity & the new Breast Cancer Haven in Solihull with half of the proceeds retain for Lions locally determined causes or run for your own cause.

Enter online at www.knowlefunrun.org.uk.

Maintaining Public Health in the 21st Century

A talk by Sara Rooney

Monday 15th January, 8.00pm, Knowle Village Hall

In a preface to Martin Chuzzlewit, written in November 1849, Charles Dickens wrote: “In all my writings, I hope I have taken every available opportunity to showing the want of sanitary improvements in the neglected dwellings of the poor”.

This was particularly the case when in 1853, in Bleak House, he wrote of “deadly stains contaminating [a character’s] dress” and “dungeon lights burning, as the lamp of life hums ….. heavily, heavily, in the nauseous air, and winking . . . at many horrible things.”

 Here was a public voice of the pressures that drove the emergence of public health professionals, alongside sanitation engineers, in the mid-1800s in a quest to eradicate cholera and other infectious diseases.

 Today, at a time when our health system is creaking badly, the role of public health professionals has changed – but remains that of tackling widespread threats to health in order to reduce the pressures on medical resources and keep people healthier and happier. But what are these 21st century perils? How are they being addressed? And could we, as citizens, help in any way?

 Come and explore this modern equivalent of a Dickensian scourge at our January Speaker Meeting. All welcome.